Lupita Nyong'o Appreciation Life





Lupita Nyong'o Appreciation Life


she's an angel isn't she?
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lafaceoaklandbooty:

The Dapper Rebels of Los Angeles, 1966



heykarli:

My friends mom is 4’9 and her dad is 6’5. Whenever she is mad at him, she grabs a chair to yell in his face. Everytime that happens, he’s laughing too hard for her to stay mad. They say it’s the only way they’ve been married for so long.



blackhistoryalbum:

Dancing With The Stars (Old Skool Style) | Best of 2013
Follow us on Twitter | Facebook | Tumblr | Pinterest

blackhistoryalbum:

Dancing With The Stars (Old Skool Style) | Best of 2013

Follow us on Twitter | Facebook | Tumblr | Pinterest





my new fav pics/gifs of harry go home roger styles at the mo 

onnaollie:

lame vacation dad harry 

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tryin to be suave harry

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making me wanna drink vodka straight harry 

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i’m ugly laughin look at his face harry

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COS I WAS AT THIS CONCERT OMG I SCREAMED SO HARD THE GLASSES!!!! 

americana harry

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weather man boo harry

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oh shit look at my life choices harry

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creepy happy smile harry

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dumb best friend at the zoo harry 

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i can’t believe he’s worth $100 million harry 

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they ain’t servin breakfast at 11am? i’m upset harry

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hands down i would frame this and sit it on my fireplace if i had one. i’mma make this into an art piece of mine later. you watch and see.

dorky peace sign harry is my fav harry :D

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LOOK AT HIS SMILE NOW CRY WITH ME harry 

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rich bf playin cute beach games harry

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blacknessuniversity:

BLACK FIRST: Mabel Fairbanks … ICE BREAKER!

Mabel Fairbanks was the first African American inducted into the US Figure Skating Hall of Fame.

She was born in New York City. As a young girl in the 1930s, Fairbanks discovered her lifetime passion watching a Sonia Henje movie. She then saw a pair of black skates in a pawnshop window and talked the guy down to $1.50. They were two sizes too big, but that didn’t stop Fairbanks. She stuffed them with cotton, found her balance on blades by going up and down the stairs in her building, and took to the nearby frozen lake. It wasn’t long before Fairbanks was sailing across the ice. When a passerby suggested she try out the rink in Central Park, she was soon skating and attaining solid 6.0 judging, but the pro clubs wouldn’t have her because of her race.

"I remember they said to me, ‘we don’t have Negroes in ice shows.’ "But I didn’t let that get in my way, because I loved to skate."

Fairbanks continued to refine her skill and returned to the rink again and again. Then one day, the manager noted her persistence and the shiny pair of new skates her uncle bought her from the Macy’s basement, and he let her inside. From then on, Fairbanks’ ability and sparkle shattered the race barrier at that pivotal rink, and professional skaters started giving her free lessons. In the 1940s, Fairbanks came to Los Angeles and performed in nightclubs like Cyro’s.

When Fairbanks was invited to skate on the road with the Rhapsody On Ice show, she jumped at the chance, even though they said they needed her as “someone to skate in the dark countries.” She wowed international audiences, returning to Los Angeles only to find it still blind to her talent but not to her color. “They had a sign at the Pasadena Winter Gardens that read “Colored Trade Not Solicited,” she remembers. “But it was a public place, so my uncle had newspaper articles written about it and passed them out everywhere until they finally let me in.”

She landed a role on KTLA television’s Frosty Follies show and continued to perform at local showrooms, yet Fairbanks still wasn’t allowed to join professional skating clubs. She got herself and other Blacks in by sending for individual memberships from the United States Professional Skating Association (USPSA), without letting them know they were black.

Fairbanks opened the door for other young Blacks to compete in skating, but her pro years had passed, so she became a teacher and coach in Culver City and the Hollywood Polar Palace. Famed Olympic medalist Scott Hamilton learned from Fairbanks when he was just a young beginner, and she gave free lessons to those too poor to pay.

While at the Polar Palace, her students included many celebrities and their children, like Natalie Cole, Ricky Nelson, Danny Kaye, and Jimmy Durante. It was Fairbanks who paired the Tai Babilonia and Randy Gardner while watching them skate. Many of her Black skating students went on to be Olympic gold medallists because she skated over, around and through walls of racism. Fairbanks’ ability to do and teach has helped cultivate some of the finest skaters of the century. “If I had been allowed to go in to the Olympics or Ice Capades like I wanted to then, I may not have helped other Blacks like I did, and coached such wonderful skaters, and I think all that has been just as important and meaningful.”

You could find Fairbanks rink side, coaching pro skaters at Iceland in Van Nuys. While the “official” skating world denied Fairbanks’ contributions, world-renowned skaters sought her out as a coach. Her students include the United States and World Champions Tai Babilonia and Randy Gardner, Kristi Yamaguchi, Rudy Galindo, and Tiffany Chin. In 1998, Fairbanks was honored with the Silver Achievement Award, Sports Category, at the YWCA’s Leader Luncheon at the Bonaventure Hotel in Los Angeles.

She taught and coached on the ice until she was 79 years old and was diagnosed with Myasthenia Gravis, a disease that weakens the muscles. Mabel Fairbanks died at 85 on September 29th, 2001 in Los Angeles.

Check out her video here:  Mabel Fairbanks





nezua:

disturbingly:

supinternets:

christianzucc0ni:

markmejia:

High School Fashion, 1969

What a trip.

wow we’ve almost come full circle

Yes please

Every time I see pictures from this era I just feel like people looked so much healthier than people today… Can’t really explain. It’s probably the food lol

Year of my birth. My mother was just 18 years old.



emily84:

coochie4gucci:

Don’t try to show out, when your little boys come to the house
‘Or I’ll walk around this bitch in my Louboutin heels with my ass hangin’ out ~OW

idk what this is from but

FLAWLESS



alexandraerin:

riiizkybusiness:

thatwillbeallmisspotts:

flakycake:

dangerpro:

Photographs: Tom Hussey

This is remarkably well done, I really like it.

These carry such an powerful message. When you see an old person you  just think ‘oh, and old man or woman. Ugh, they’re so boring.’ These people are much more than what you see. They’ve had lives, they’ve done and accomplished  many, many things. They’re not just some ‘old person’.

Very impressive concept. Now this is photography!

I love reblogging this when ever it shows up.

The nurse one really got to me…

The college grad looks like he’s having a conversation with himself. Like, “Heeeey, we made it!” “Yeah… yeah, we sure did.”



auntada:

The Grape-Vine Swing
ca. 1895
Photographer, location unidentified
Smithsonian American Art Museum

auntada:

The Grape-Vine Swing

ca. 1895

Photographer, location unidentified

Smithsonian American Art Museum



illartistry:

Get Ya Sheen On

illartistry:

Get Ya Sheen On



permanentexhibition:

Phylicia (Ayers-Allen) Rashad and Debbie Allen, photographed by Moneta Sleet, Jr. for Ebony. From Debbie’s pointed toe to their beautiful smiles, it’s probably one of my favorite magazine photos ever.

permanentexhibition:

Phylicia (Ayers-Allen) Rashad and Debbie Allen, photographed by Moneta Sleet, Jr. for Ebony. From Debbie’s pointed toe to their beautiful smiles, it’s probably one of my favorite magazine photos ever.



icecreamritual:

BUT WHERE IS THIS FROM? TUMBLR DONT LET ME DOWN

icecreamritual:

BUT WHERE IS THIS FROM? TUMBLR DONT LET ME DOWN